The U.S. is in for a rare astrological treat on Aug. 21, 2017 — that's the day of the "Great American Eclipse." It's the first total solar eclipse to cross the entire U.S. in 99 years, and more than 12 million Americans live in its path. Sarah Whitmire McClatchy
The U.S. is in for a rare astrological treat on Aug. 21, 2017 — that's the day of the "Great American Eclipse." It's the first total solar eclipse to cross the entire U.S. in 99 years, and more than 12 million Americans live in its path. Sarah Whitmire McClatchy

Fort Worth

Museum astronomer will livestream eclipse back to Fort Worth audience

August 19, 2017 6:35 AM

FORT WORTH

Noble Planetarium manager Sarah Twidal will livestream the Great American Eclipse from Oregon to Fort Worth on Monday.

Twidal planned to leave for Albany, Oregon, on Saturday morning to be at a spot in the path of totality where the shadow of the moon will soon totally block the sun and turn the earth dark.

Sarah Twidal

“I’m thrilled to see my first in-person solar eclipse,” she said before leaving. “But I’m a little nervous to leave the museum, to be away and not helping out.”

She’ll set up in the back yard of a friend’s house for the main event, she said. That’ll happen about 12:15 p.m. CDT on Monday where she is.

The Fort Worth Museum of Science and History will show the livestream in the Omni Theater, which seats 375 people, as well as in the innovation studios (capacity 300 or so), the Noble Planetarium (80 seats) and the wall of the atrium. The museum event will be from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

“I hope for the best of weather and safety, and for a spectacular view of this amazing phenomenon,” Twidal said separately in a news release. “I hope to bring back stories, like others before me, of the unique chance to see planets and stars come into sight at midday, of the reactions this event prompts in the natural world.”

In addition to Twidal, physicist and astronomer Dr. Doug Roberts, the museum’s chief technology officer, will head north to experience the total eclipse.

Dr. Doug Roberts

He’ll be using technology that will enable him to record the event and do a virtual reality playback afterward.

“If all goes well, watching the eclipse played back in VR should be the next best thing to being there!” he said in the news release.

Tom Uhler: 817-390-7832, @tomuh

How to safely watch a solar eclipse

Never look directly at the sun's rays. When watching a partial eclipse you must wear eclipse glasses at all times or use another indirect method if you want to face the sun. During a total eclipse when the moon completely obscures the sun, it is safe to look directly at the star -- but it's crucial that you know when to wear and not wear your glasses. Credit: NASA Goddard/YouTube

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