Here's what a goat yoga class looks like

Goat yoga founder Lainey Morse holds goat yoga classes in Oregon. This shows a goat yoga class on April 20, 2017.
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Goat yoga founder Lainey Morse holds goat yoga classes in Oregon. This shows a goat yoga class on April 20, 2017.
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Northeast Tarrant

Get your goat at a new Grapevine yoga class — no kidding

May 19, 2017 12:58 PM

GRAPEVINE

David Mote’s phone has not stopped buzzing for the last 24 hours — since he posted to Facebook about Grapevine Parks and Recreation’s latest event: goat yoga.

Mote, the city recreation coordinator, was listening to Hawkeye in the Morning on 96.3 KSCS on his way to work when he first heard about the latest fitness trend.

“I Googled it, did some research and thought, ‘This is something we need to do in Grapevine,’ ” Mote said.

Goat yoga is just what is sounds like — a yoga class with goats. Participants go through yoga poses in class while baby goats snuggle with them and climb around on them.

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After some hard work and preparation, Mote got everything together to set up the first class. A partnership with Nash Farms gave them a location, while Red Barn Feed Store in Kennedale will provide the initial group of 10 to 15 baby goats for a day.

Mote posted the event to Facebook before leaving work Thursday and almost immediately returned when he began receiving hundreds of emails and phone calls from people wanting to register. The class was booked within 30 minutes of posting the event, Mote said.

The class in Grapevine was originally going to have 30 spots, but after he saw the demand, Mote capped it off at 45 and decided to create another class. He said around noon Friday that the second class would likely be full before he could finish answering all his emails.

Some people were asking to register individually while others sent emails hoping to register for themselves and their friends. Mote said some people even jokingly offered bribes.

“I hope it will be a good experience for people. It’s something that hasn’t been offered in this area,” Mote said.

This fitness trend was created by Lainey Morse, who first started the class at her small Oregon farm in 2016.

“It may sound silly but goat yoga is really helping people,” Morse told CNN.com. “People come in that have anxiety, depression, they’re recovering from cancer or illness. It’s not curing diseases, but it’s helping people cope with whatever they’re going through.”

She told CNN.com that a woman came up to her during a party at her farm and offered up the idea of teaching a yoga class there. Morse agreed, as long as her goats could be involved. Now her class has a waiting list exceeding 1,100 people.

“Baby Goat Yoga??? Yes, I WILL drive 3 hours over icy road for this!” said one reviewer on Morse’s official Goat Yoga Facebook page. “I’ve had a rough couple of years and this put a smile on my face that I can’t remember feeling in awhile.”

The sold-out introductory classes will be at 7 a.m. and 8 a.m. June 3 in Grapevine. Information on additional classes will be on the Grapevine Parks and Recreation Facebook page.

Azia Branson: 817-390-7547, @aziabranson