In this video captured at 1,500 frames per second with a high-speed camera, the International Space Station, with a crew of six onboard, is seen in silhouette as it transits the sun during a partial solar eclipse, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017 near Banner, Wyoming. A total solar eclipse swept across part of the contiguous United States from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. NASA/Joel Kowsky
In this video captured at 1,500 frames per second with a high-speed camera, the International Space Station, with a crew of six onboard, is seen in silhouette as it transits the sun during a partial solar eclipse, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017 near Banner, Wyoming. A total solar eclipse swept across part of the contiguous United States from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. NASA/Joel Kowsky

Nation & World

The International Space Station just photobombed the eclipse

By Teresa Welsh

twelsh@mcclatchy.com

August 21, 2017 04:31 PM

UPDATED August 22, 2017 06:53 AM

It’s not too often you can see the International Space Station from Earth. But as Americans were transfixed by the sky Monday afternoon, the station made a special appearance.

In a solar eclipse photo taken near Banner, Wyoming, the International Space Station is visible against the sun as the moon is beginning to move over it. The station moves about five miles per second and orbits 240 statute miles above earth.

Six people are currently on board, including three American astronauts from NASA. Also a part of Expedition 52 are two Russians and an Italian representing the European Space Agency. That crew’s mission ends in September after focusing on astrophysics, technology demonstrations, biology and biotechnology. NASA also expects Expedition 52 to include one spacewalk.

The solar eclipse moved from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina as it arced across the continental U.S. Some cities experienced complete totality, when the sun was completely obscured by the moon, while others saw only partial covering of the sun. The next solar eclipse in the U.S. is in 2024.

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Timelapse from a drone captures the solar eclipse during a baseball game Columbia, S.C.

During the solar eclipse, a drone captured video of the view over a Fireflies game at Spirit Communications Park in Columbia, S.C., on Aug. 21, 2017. Totality lasted nearly 90 seconds, but this timelapse video is sped up by 400 percent.

Rachel Wise McClatchy