Volunteers and police officers collect water and snacks at the Fort Worth Police Jones Street Substation in Fort Worth, TX, Monday, Aug. 28, 2017. The Fort Worth Police Department are sending 100 officers, drinking water, and snacks to Houston to help to Harvey victims. Max Faulkner mfaulkner@star-telegram.com
Volunteers and police officers collect water and snacks at the Fort Worth Police Jones Street Substation in Fort Worth, TX, Monday, Aug. 28, 2017. The Fort Worth Police Department are sending 100 officers, drinking water, and snacks to Houston to help to Harvey victims. Max Faulkner mfaulkner@star-telegram.com

Editorials

When the chips are down, Texans step up

The Editorial Board

August 28, 2017 05:37 PM

If events around the nation over the past several weeks have challenged your faith in America, than the bravery, compassion and good will displayed in Texas this weekend should restore it.

Hurricane Harvey, a category 4 storm, wrecked Texas' southern coast on Friday night and Saturday morning, and is still dumping torrents of rain in parts of the state.

Downtown Houston is under water. Rain is still falling and is expected to continue for days.

The wind damage in Rockport and Port Aransas has left the resort towns in ruins.

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At least eight people have lost their lives, and hundreds are stranded, awaiting rescue.

But thousands more have been rescued, thanks to the heroic efforts of federal, state and local first responders, and ordinary people whose courage in crisis has been truly extraordinary.

In a video that quickly went viral, a man readying his personal boat for launch was asked by a reporter, "What are you going to do?"

"I'm going to try to save some lives," is his matter-of-fact reply. And he was only one of the hundreds--perhaps thousands of people with the same mission in mind.

The Cajun Navy has mobilized hundreds of volunteers in fishing boats to rescue the stranded.

Many residents and business owners whose homes and stores have been spared are making facilities available to those who have been forced to evacuate.

Police and other local law enforcement and response teams have been working without sleep to ensure no call for help remains unanswered.

With the weather reports still calling for more rain, there's a dire sense that the worst is not yet over.

And that will mean more help will be needed in the days, weeks and sadly months and years to come.

If the last several days serve as any indication, our state will come through this devastation because of the overwhelming response of Texans tirelessly helping other Texans.

Governor Greg Abbott said during a press conference Monday that the locals who stayed behind and volunteered to rescue those trapped in the flood waters "literally saved lives."

"There are so many heroes in Houston," Abbott said."I'm so proud to be a Texan."

We are, too.