TCU defensive end Ben Banogu, left, forces a fumble by Oklahoma State quarterback Mason Rudolph, during the first half of an NCAA college football game in Stillwater. Rudolph committed four turnovers as No. 16 TCU scored the upset win at No. 6 Oklahoma State. Brody Schmidt AP
TCU defensive end Ben Banogu, left, forces a fumble by Oklahoma State quarterback Mason Rudolph, during the first half of an NCAA college football game in Stillwater. Rudolph committed four turnovers as No. 16 TCU scored the upset win at No. 6 Oklahoma State. Brody Schmidt AP

The Big Mac Blog

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The Big Mac Blog

TCU scores biggest win in its Big 12 football history

September 23, 2017 7:14 PM

STILLWATER, Okla.

T. Boone cannot be happy about this one.

No. 16 TCU entered Stillwater as a 12.5-point underdog, at least, to No. 6 Oklahoma State and left town the winner by a wider margin.

The last time TCU scored a look-at-this score as big as their 44-31 win at T. Boone State was 2014 when the Frogs upset No. 4 Oklahoma in Fort Worth.

This one was on the road, in a place where they never play well, against a quarterback regarded as the best in the nation.

TCU did not punt until midway through the fourth quarter. It nearly doubled Oklahoma State in time of possession. OK State committed four turnovers to TCU’s one.

The Frogs dominated the game from the start, and only because of a flurry of late offense by the Cowboys was the game interesting. And it did turn interesting late.

OSU cut the deficit to six points and had TCU facing a 3rd-and-4 from the Cowboys’ 42 yard line with 2:37 remaining in the game. TCU running back Darius Anderson broke through a large hole to score on a touchdown sprint that pretty much ended the day’s events.

“That wasn’t nearly as fun as the last few we played,” OSU coach Mike Gundy said. “We got out-coached.”

Agreed.

Anderson ran for 160 yards on 26 carries, and quarterback Kenny Hill only had one mistake, a second-quarter interception that did not bite his team.

Pollsters, don’t blow this: TCU should be ranked in the Top 10 in the AP Poll when the new rankings are released on Sunday.

No. 1 The T. Boone Curse is no more. Stillwater is the one place TCU had not come close to winning as a member of the Big 12. The Frogs were 0-2 in Stillwater, losing both games by at least two touchdowns.

In 2015, TCU rolled into Stillwater 8-0, and had a Heisman hopeful in quarterback Trevone Boykin, and an All-American receiver in Josh Doctson.

The Frogs were blown out 49-29.

There were no similarities between Saturday afternoon and that game in 2015. After falling behind 7-6, TCU re-gained the lead and eventually led 34-17 near the end of the third quarter. They were the better team from the start.

No. 1.5. Oklahoma State was at a major disadvantage when it was announced at the start of the game that the Cowboys were without their starting right tackle and right guard. TCU exploited that weakness throughout the game, and applied pressure to Mason Rudolph from that side throughout.

No. 2 TCU’s offensive line. There is no single biggest reason TCU is 4-0, but start with the offensive line. Since TCU joined the Big 12, offensive line was the one area that was not quite consistently up to Big 12 caliber. It had been erratic. Watching TCU in wins at Arkansas and now Oklahoma State, this is the best offensive line TCU has had. Possibly ever.

No. 2.5 TCU at Oklahoma. That is TCU’s next, and only, remaining ranked opponent. That game is Nov. 11 in Norman.

No. 3 Speaking of the Sooners. Don’t expect TCU’s road schedule in the Sooner State to change. Not next year. Or the year after. Or ever. Since TCU joined the Big 12 in 2012, TCU has had the disadvantage of having to go on the road and play at Oklahoma State and at Oklahoma every other year.

Even Gary Patterson concedes it’s something that should be changed.

Big 12 commissioner Bob Bowlsby attended the game on Saturday and I asked him about the prospect of TCU splitting the road games against the Oklahoma schools.

The answer is no. The only way to do it is to have TCU play at the Oklahoma schools on the road for a second consecutive season, and then you could split it.

That’s not happening.

TCU fans just need to embrace driving to Oklahoma twice a year ... and by embrace, I mean, dread.

Mac Engel: @macengelprof

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